It is currently 17 Apr 2014 15:18

All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: What are some ethical dilemmas in selling organs and organ d
PostPosted: 17 Dec 2012 16:50 
New forum contributor
New forum contributor
Offline

Joined: 17 Dec 2012 16:49
Posts: 1
What are some ethical dilemmas in selling organs and organ donation?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are some ethical dilemmas in selling organs and org
PostPosted: 17 Dec 2012 21:57 
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Offline

Joined: 09 May 2011 14:38
Posts: 88
Some of the issues were touched on in a forum topic about this issue in 2008. Here is a post made then. It contains a link to a British Medical Journal article, which you can read in full by registering on their site:-

Quote:
This question has cropped up before, here - where the question was whether a prisoner should be allowed to trade an organ for remission of his sentence, and here where the discussion was about a commercial market in human kidneys.

The current issue of the British Medical Journal revisits the debate.http://www.bmj.com/content/336/7657/1342.short

Arthur J Matas, professor of surgery at University of Minnesota, thinks that living donors should be paid for organs such as kidneys. He points out that there is already a clandestine, unregulated trade notably in developing countries, and that it would be preferable to bring this under strict legal regulation, so as to ensure quality of donated organs, to reduce the likelihood of donors being coerced into parting with organs and, hopefully, to increase supply.

Jeremy Chapman, professer in the Centre for Transplant and Renal Research, University of Sydney, is strongly against the idea. He reports that:

Selling organs does not help people lift themselves from destitution. In the bazaars of India and Pakistan, people sell kidneys to pay off debts, but average family income declines by a third, more live below the poverty line, and 86% report deterioration in their health. The only people who clearly benefit are the intermediaries who take money as the kidney transits from the vendor to the recipient: organ brokers, transplant surgeons, hospitals, government officials, and the wealthy health insurance companies of the West and the Middle East.

He also adds that organ sales destroy donation. Nobody will donate a kidney to a family member or friend if government provides a supply by purchasing from organ vendors:

Which recipient will risk a family member’s health when government will pay? And if a kidney is worth money before death, families or individuals will demand money for consent to retrieval of organs after death. Surely the payment must be higher after death because you can use organs that cannot be retrieved from live people?

The consequences of regulated organ purchase will be an implosion in organ donation, reduction in kidney transplantations and destruction of heart, lung, liver, and pancreas transplantation. Purchase of organs is not the answer.

Medical factors involved in organ transplants are well understood. What is in dispute here is the economics and ethics of it.
Quote:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are some ethical dilemmas in selling organs and org
PostPosted: 06 Jan 2013 00:26 
Forum contributor
Forum contributor
Offline

Joined: 19 Sep 2011 23:52
Posts: 54
One issue I have with the selling of organs is the potential exploitation of the poor and marginalised, such as the unemployed and the working poor.

Those with substance issues such as alcoholics, drug addicts may choose to sell an organ to finance their habit.

Giving someone an organ is good, altruistic donation is I feel the best, as it prevents this potential exploitation. Of cause there needs to be some incentive to donate, but I don't believe that the economic incentive is the way.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: What are some ethical dilemmas in selling organs and org
PostPosted: 30 Jan 2013 18:24 
New forum contributor
New forum contributor
Offline

Joined: 29 Nov 2012 16:28
Posts: 2
Since the first human kidney was transplanted in 1954, the nation has engaged in searching public discussions about the ethics of organ transplantation: about the human significance of removing organs from both living and cadaveric donors; about the criteria for determining when death occurs and thus when the decedent's organs might be taken; about whose wishes should ultimately decide whether organs are used or not used; and about the ethics of different organ procurement and allocation laws.

The current organ policy is shaped largely by two important laws: The first is the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act of 1968, adopted in all fifty states, which granted individuals the right to decide before death whether they wished to donate their organs; the second is the Organ Transplantation Act of 1984, which aimed to encourage organ donation by establishing an organized organ matching and procurement network, while outlawing the buying and selling of human organs or the direct compensation of organ donors and their families. Taken together, these laws sought to reap the medical benefits of organ transplantation and to encourage individuals to become organ donors, while preserving certain ethical limits against treating the body as property and the newly dead as simply natural resources. It also sought to ensure, as much as possible given other inequities in the health-care system, that organs are allocated in an equitable way.

Whether this policy has been a great success or terrible failure – both medically and ethically – is a complex question. Many lives have been saved that would not have been otherwise, and yet waiting lists for organs continue to increase. Many individuals have given of themselves (literally) to save the life of another, and yet the unequivocal protection of those who are not-yet-dead (but would be useful if they were) has been called into question. The human body (dead or alive) has not been reduced to mere property, and yet the desperation of watching thousands of individuals die every year while waiting for organs has prompted a renewed debate about whether monetary incentives should be used in an effort to increase organ supply.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 10 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Based on Maroon Fusion theme created by Oxydo, modified by Simone Walsh